Official advice for New Zealanders living and travelling overseas

  • Reviewed: 9 May 2018, 16:15 NZST
  • Still current at: 17 October 2018

Do not travel

Do not travel to the border area with Eritrea, as a long-running border dispute has caused tensions between Djibouti and Eritrea. The security situation remains fragile and further conflict is a possibility.

Exercise increased caution

Exercise increased caution elsewhere in Djibouti due to the threat from terrorism.

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Terrorism
There is an ongoing threat from terrorism in Djibouti. The Somalia-based terrorist group Al-Shabaab has issued public threats against Djibouti. In May 2014, they claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing at La Chaumiere restaurant in Djibouti city, which killed 3 and injured many more, including foreign nationals. Past attacks have resulted in foreign fatalities and the possibility of future indiscriminate attacks, particularly in areas frequented by foreigners, cannot be discounted.

New Zealanders in Djibouti are advised to be security conscious at all times, monitor the media, and follow any instructions and restrictions issued by the local authorities. Particular care should be taken in crowded and public places and in areas known to be frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers. Remain vigilant.

Civil unrest
Demonstrations occur from time to time in Djibouti, mostly linked to domestic political developments. New Zealanders should avoid large crowds and public demonstrations as they have the potential to turn violent.

Crime
Petty crime such as bag snatching and pickpocketing occurs in Djibouti and is common in tourist areas. We advise New Zealanders to be alert to their surroundings at all times and take steps to safeguard and secure their personal belongings. Avoid wearing or displaying items that appear valuable, such as electronic devices and jewellery and walking and travelling at night, particularly to isolated areas.

Piracy
Piracy remains a significant problem in the coastal areas of Djibouti. Attacks against all forms of shipping are common in and around Djibouti’s waters and the Gulf of Aden. Mariners are strongly advised to take appropriate precautionary measures in these waters. For more information view the International Maritime Bureau's piracy report.

General travel advice
There is a danger from unexploded landmines Djibouti along the border with Eritrea. Mined areas may be unmarked. New Zealanders are advised not to stray off well used roads and paths in rural areas.

New Zealanders are advised to respect religious, social and cultural traditions in Djibouti to avoid offending local sensitivities. Modesty and discretion should be exercised in both dress and behaviour.

Photography of any official infrastructure is prohibited, and could result in detention. If in doubt, don’t take a picture.

New Zealanders travelling or living in Djibouti should have a comprehensive travel insurance policy in place that includes provision for medical evacuation by air.

New Zealanders in Djibouti are encouraged to register their details with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.


The New Zealand Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia is accredited to Djibouti

Street Address New Zealand Embassy, Apartment 381, Hilton Hotel, Menelik II Avenue, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Postal Address P.O.Box 25656 code 1000 Telephone +251-11-515-1269 Fax +251-11-552-6115 Email aue@mfat.govt.nz Web Site https://www.mfat.govt.nz/ethiopia Hours Monday – Friday, 9am-12pm & 1pm-4pm Note In case of an emergency outside of office hours, please call the after-hours duty service on +251 935 021 436

See our regional advice for Africa

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Accredited New Zealand Embassy Ethiopia

Street Address
New Zealand Embassy, Apartment 381, Hilton Hotel, Menelik II Avenue, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Telephone: +251-11-515-1269

Fax: +251-11-552-6115

Email: aue@mfat.govt.nz

Website: https://www.mfat.govt.nz/ethiopia

Hours: Monday – Friday, 9am-12pm & 1pm-4pm

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